Difference between revisions of "Basic Block"

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__FORCETOC__
 
__FORCETOC__
  
This tutorial should introduce you into the basic of adding a block to the game using JSON files. If you want to add a block with functionality you should check out the tutorial for [[Advanced Blocks]]. There is a full list of all properties which can be defined inside the json file [[Block Json Properties]].
+
Please read the tutorial [[Getting Started with Advanced Modding#Domains|Getting Started]] first, if you haven't done it already. This tutorial should introduce you into the basic of adding a block to the game using JSON files. If you want to add a block with functionality you should check out the tutorial for [[Advanced Blocks]]. There is a full list of all properties which can be defined inside the json file [[Block Json Properties|here]].
  
 
= A Simple Block =
 
= A Simple Block =
  
To get started let's start with something simple. In our example we will add an ordinary gold block (will be for decorative use only) to the game.
+
To get started let's create something simple. In our example we will add an ordinary gold block to the game (will be for decorative use only). So let's call this mod '''MyGoldBlock'''.
 +
 
 +
== Workspace ==
 +
 
 +
First of all it is useful to create a new folder to keep everything nice and clean. Inside this '''workspace''' we will create the mod itself, and later on put it into a zip file, so we can test it and distribute it to other people.
  
 
== The Texture ==
 
== The Texture ==
  
First of all we need a texture. We will add a gold block to the game using this texture: [[File:Gold block.png]].
+
We will use this texture for our block: [[File:Gold block.png]].
  
Now we need to copy the texture to the game assets. Therefore navigate to the [[Vintagestory folder]] and place it in <code>assets\textures\blocks\metal\</code>. Eventually rename it to <code>mygoldtexture.png</code>
+
Now we need to put the texture at the right place so we can use it later on. Therefore you have to rename the texture to <code>mygoldtexture.png</code> and put it inside <code>assets/mygoldblock/textures/block/</code> in your workspace (you have to create those folders first). <code>mygoldblock</code> will be our domain.
  
== The JSON file ==
+
== The Block File ==
  
Now we need a json file which will determine the properties this block has. For now we keep it simple and only cover simple properties, but there are a lot of other things you can do with. Here is a full list of all [[Block Json Properties]]. So create a new json file in your editor (we recommend to use an editor with syntax highlighting, such as [https://notepad-plus-plus.org/ Notepad++] or Visual Studio) named <code>mygoldblock.json</code>.
+
The next thing we are going to need is a json file which will determine the properties of the block. For now we will keep it simple and will work with simple properties only. If you want to do some more advanced stuff you can take a look at the [[Block Json Properties|Block Properties Overview]].
 +
 
 +
Now you need to create a new json file in your editor (we recommend to use an editor with syntax highlighting, such as [https://notepad-plus-plus.org/ Notepad++] or Visual Studio).
  
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="json">
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="json">
Line 21: Line 27:
 
code: "mygoldblock",
 
code: "mygoldblock",
 
creativeinventory: { "general": ["*"] },
 
creativeinventory: { "general": ["*"] },
shape: { base: "basic/cube" },
 
 
blockmaterial: "Stone",
 
blockmaterial: "Stone",
drawtype: "cube",
+
drawtype: "Cube",
 
textures: {
 
textures: {
all: { base: "metal/mygoldtexture" }
+
all: { base: "block/mygoldtexture" }
 
},
 
},
 
resistance: 3.5,
 
resistance: 3.5,
 
sounds: {
 
sounds: {
"place": "block/anvil",
+
"place": "game:block/anvil",
"walk": "walk/stone"
+
"walk": "game:walk/stone"
 
}
 
}
 
}
 
}
 
</syntaxhighlight>
 
</syntaxhighlight>
 
  
 
Short explanation of each line:
 
Short explanation of each line:
  
* '''code''': A unique identifier for your block. If you plan a larger mod, it is suggested to prefix your modname to the identifier.
+
* '''code''': A unique identifier for your block.
 
* '''creativeinventory''': The creative inventory tabs the block should be shown in (currently only 1 tab available)
 
* '''creativeinventory''': The creative inventory tabs the block should be shown in (currently only 1 tab available)
 
* '''shape''': Which model the block should use
 
* '''shape''': Which model the block should use
Line 44: Line 48:
 
* '''textures''': What textures to apply. For simple blocks you can define one single texture for 'all' faces or define one for every facing ('north', 'east', 'west', 'south', 'up', 'down')
 
* '''textures''': What textures to apply. For simple blocks you can define one single texture for 'all' faces or define one for every facing ('north', 'east', 'west', 'south', 'up', 'down')
 
* '''resistance''': How many seconds of real life time it takes to break the block without tools
 
* '''resistance''': How many seconds of real life time it takes to break the block without tools
* '''sounds''': The sounds to be played when placing/breaking or walking on the block
+
* '''sounds''': The sounds to be played when placing/breaking or walking on the block. The prefix <code>game</code> has to be added, since our block has the domain <code>mygoldblock</code>. Otherwise it would try to find those sounds inside our domain.
  
Now navigate to the [[Vintagestory folder]] again and place the json file for example in <code>assets\assets\blocktypes\metal\</code>. The sub-folders in <code>blocktypes</code> are only for organisation purposes, the engine does not handle them in any special way.
+
Now save the file in your workspace inside <code>assets/mygoldblock/blocktypes/</code> and name it <code>mygoldblock.json</code>.
 
 
== Testing ==
 
 
 
Finally we got everything ready to run our first test. Therefore start Vintagestory as usual, you should be able to find your block inside the creative inventory.
 
 
 
[[File:2017-01-10 12-33-45.png|700px]].
 
  
 
== Naming the Block ==
 
== Naming the Block ==
  
To give the block a proper name, you currently have to manually add a line like this in the file <code>assets/lang/en.json</code>
+
To give the block a proper name, we need to create another json file and save it with the following path: <code>assets/mygoldblock/lang/en.json</code>
  
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="json">
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="json">
"block-mygoldblock": "Block of Gold",
+
{
 +
"block-mygoldblock": "Block of Gold"
 +
}
 
</syntaxhighlight>
 
</syntaxhighlight>
  
A better way of handling naming and translation will be added once its desired.
+
== Testing/ Distribution ==
 +
 
 +
The last thing we need to do is to create a zip file of the assets folder inside our workspace. Either you use an external program (such as WinRAR or 7Zip) or you right-click the <code>assets</code> folder and hit '''Send To''' -> '''Compressed (zipped) folder'''. Eventually you can rename the zip file to <code>MyGoldBlockMod.zip</code>. The zip file can be either used for testing purposes or you can send it to other people so they can use it as well.
 +
 
 +
Furthermore you need to add a <code>modinfo.json</code> file, check out [[Game_Content_Mod|this tutorial]].
  
== Distributing a mod ==
+
To install the mod, navigate to the [[Vintagestory folder]] and place it inside the mods folder.
  
The current modding system does not yet support mod-specific asset folders. The current way of doing it is to create a zip file a user can extract into his game folder that will extract the files into the right folders. Example:
+
[https://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/4/4c/MyGoldBlockMod.zip MyGoldBlockMod.zip]
  
[http://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/4/4c/MyGoldBlockMod.zip MyGoldBlockMod.zip]
+
[[File:2017-01-10 12-33-45.png|700px]].
  
A proper mod manager will be added to the game once there is a few serious mods out there (go bug tyron about it ;-) ).
+
'''Hint''': Use the client command <code>.tfedit</code> if you want to adjust the block position, rotation and scale in Hands, in GUI, when dropped on the ground or in third person mode.
  
 
= Advanced Properties =
 
= Advanced Properties =
Line 85: Line 89:
 
textures: {
 
textures: {
 
all: {  
 
all: {  
base: "metal/mygoldtexture",
+
base: "block/mygoldtexture",
alternates: [{base: "metal/mygoldtexture1" }, {base: "metal/mygoldtexture2" }, {base: "metal/mygoldtexture3" }],
+
alternates: [{base: "block/mygoldtexture1" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture2" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture3" }],
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
},
Line 99: Line 103:
 
== Variants ==
 
== Variants ==
  
Gold is the best, but iron is awesome too ... so what shall will do? Let's add another variant of this block, because we all love iron.
+
Gold is the best, but iron is awesome too ... so what shall we do? Let's add another variant of this block, because we all love iron.
  
 
You could duplicate the blocktype file and rename silver to gold in all the places, or you can simply add another variant to the existing blocktype.
 
You could duplicate the blocktype file and rename silver to gold in all the places, or you can simply add another variant to the existing blocktype.
Line 121: Line 125:
 
"*-gold": {
 
"*-gold": {
 
all: {  
 
all: {  
base: "metal/mygoldtexture",
+
base: "block/mygoldtexture",
alternates: [{base: "metal/mygoldtexture1" }, {base: "metal/mygoldtexture2" }, {base: "metal/mygoldtexture3" }],
+
alternates: [{base: "block/mygoldtexture1" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture2" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture3" }],
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
"*-iron": {
 
"*-iron": {
 
all: {  
 
all: {  
base: "metal/myirontexture",
+
base: "block/myirontexture",
alternates: [{base: "metal/myirontexture1" }, {base: "metal/myirontexture2" }, {base: "metal/myirontexture3" }],
+
alternates: [{base: "block/myirontexture1" }, {base: "block/myirontexture2" }, {base: "block/myirontexture3" }],
 
},
 
},
 
}
 
}
Line 141: Line 145:
 
textures: {
 
textures: {
 
all: {  
 
all: {  
base: "metal/my{type}texture",
+
base: "block/my{type}texture",
alternates: [{base: "metal/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "metal/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "metal/my{type}texture3" }],
+
alternates: [{base: "block/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture3" }],
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
},
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{ code: "type", states: ["gold", "iron"] }
 
{ code: "type", states: ["gold", "iron"] }
 
],
 
],
shape: { base: "basic/cube" },
 
 
blockmaterial: "Stone",
 
blockmaterial: "Stone",
 
drawtype: "cube",
 
drawtype: "cube",
 
textures: {
 
textures: {
 
all: {  
 
all: {  
base: "metal/my{type}texture",
+
base: "block/my{type}texture",
alternates: [{base: "metal/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "metal/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "metal/my{type}texture3" }],
+
alternates: [{base: "block/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture3" }],
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
resistance: 3.5,
 
resistance: 3.5,
 
sounds: {
 
sounds: {
"place": "block/anvil",
+
"place": "game:block/anvil",
"walk": "walk/stone"
+
"walk": "game:walk/stone"
 
}
 
}
 
}
 
}
Line 191: Line 194:
 
"*-good": {
 
"*-good": {
 
all: {  
 
all: {  
base: "metal/my{type}texture",
+
base: "block/my{type}texture",
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
"*-used": {
 
"*-used": {
 
all: {  
 
all: {  
base: "metal/my{type}texture",
+
base: "block/my{type}texture",
alternates: [{base: "metal/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "metal/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "metal/my{type}texture3" }],
+
alternates: [{base: "block/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture3" }],
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
},
Line 211: Line 214:
 
In order to use a custom shape we need to create one first. The engine only supports the model/shape format that's created by the [[VS Model Creator]].
 
In order to use a custom shape we need to create one first. The engine only supports the model/shape format that's created by the [[VS Model Creator]].
  
Once you have created your own shape you need to export it as a json file and move it to <code>assets/shapes/blocks/</code>. In our example we will use this model [http://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/3/38/Myshinymodel.json Myshinymodel.json] and move it to <code>assets/shapes/blocks/metal/myshinymodel.json</code>.
+
Once you have created your own shape you need to export it as a json file, create a new folder <code>assets/myshinyblock/shapes/block/</code> and save the file in there. In our example we will use this model [https://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/3/38/Myshinymodel.json Myshinymodel.json] and move it to <code>assets/myshinyblock/shapes/block/myshinymodel.json</code>.
Now we need to specify the model inside our block type json file (<code>assets/blocktypes/metal/myshinyblock.json</code>).
+
Now we need to specify the model inside our block type json file.
  
 
Therefore we will change the drawtype from <code>cube</code> to <code>json</code>:
 
Therefore we will change the drawtype from <code>cube</code> to <code>json</code>:
Line 219: Line 222:
 
</syntaxhighlight>
 
</syntaxhighlight>
  
and the shape to <code>metal/myshinymodel</code>
+
and the shape to <code>myshinymodel</code>
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="json">
 
<syntaxhighlight lang="json">
shape: { base: "metal/myshinymodel" },
+
shape: { base: "block/myshinymodel" },
 
</syntaxhighlight>
 
</syntaxhighlight>
  
Line 240: Line 243:
 
== Variants of Custom Shapes ==
 
== Variants of Custom Shapes ==
  
I created another model for the blocks in good condition ([http://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/f/fa/Myshinymodel1.json myshinymodel1.json]), because they should look more awesome, than the ones in used conditions. Therefore we need to copy the json file to <code>assets/shapes/block/metal/</code> as well.
+
I created another model for the blocks in good condition ([https://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/f/fa/Myshinymodel1.json myshinymodel1.json]), because they should look more awesome, than the ones in used conditions. Therefore we need to copy the json file to <code>assets/myshinyblock/shapes/block/</code> as well.
  
 
In order to specify the shape by type we need to remove the property <code>shape</code> and replace it with <code>shapebytype</code>:
 
In order to specify the shape by type we need to remove the property <code>shape</code> and replace it with <code>shapebytype</code>:
Line 246: Line 249:
 
shapebytype: {
 
shapebytype: {
 
"*-good": {
 
"*-good": {
base: "metal/myshinymodel1",
+
base: "block/myshinymodel1",
 
},
 
},
 
"*-used": {
 
"*-used": {
base: "metal/myshinymodel",
+
base: "block/myshinymodel",
 
},
 
},
 
},
 
},
Line 256: Line 259:
 
[[File:2017-01-12 14-51-45.png|700px]]
 
[[File:2017-01-12 14-51-45.png|700px]]
  
[http://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/4/42/MyShinyBlockMod.zip MyShinyBlockMod]
+
[https://wiki.vintagestory.at/images/4/42/MyShinyBlockMod.zip MyShinyBlockMod]
  
 
There are a lot of more things you can do with the blocktype and model formats. We recommend you to take a look at the Vintage Story block type files to understand how the system is working, in case something was left unexplained.
 
There are a lot of more things you can do with the blocktype and model formats. We recommend you to take a look at the Vintage Story block type files to understand how the system is working, in case something was left unexplained.
 
We hope we could introduce you into the basic of adding blocks the game. [[Advanced Blocks]] will teach you how to add more functionality to your block.
 
We hope we could introduce you into the basic of adding blocks the game. [[Advanced Blocks]] will teach you how to add more functionality to your block.
 +
 +
 +
 +
{{Navbox/modding|Vintage Story}}

Latest revision as of 16:17, 6 May 2019


Please read the tutorial Getting Started first, if you haven't done it already. This tutorial should introduce you into the basic of adding a block to the game using JSON files. If you want to add a block with functionality you should check out the tutorial for Advanced Blocks. There is a full list of all properties which can be defined inside the json file here.

A Simple Block

To get started let's create something simple. In our example we will add an ordinary gold block to the game (will be for decorative use only). So let's call this mod MyGoldBlock.

Workspace

First of all it is useful to create a new folder to keep everything nice and clean. Inside this workspace we will create the mod itself, and later on put it into a zip file, so we can test it and distribute it to other people.

The Texture

We will use this texture for our block: Gold block.png.

Now we need to put the texture at the right place so we can use it later on. Therefore you have to rename the texture to mygoldtexture.png and put it inside assets/mygoldblock/textures/block/ in your workspace (you have to create those folders first). mygoldblock will be our domain.

The Block File

The next thing we are going to need is a json file which will determine the properties of the block. For now we will keep it simple and will work with simple properties only. If you want to do some more advanced stuff you can take a look at the Block Properties Overview.

Now you need to create a new json file in your editor (we recommend to use an editor with syntax highlighting, such as Notepad++ or Visual Studio).

{
	code: "mygoldblock",
	creativeinventory: { "general": ["*"] },
	blockmaterial: "Stone",
	drawtype: "Cube",
	textures: {
		all: { base: "block/mygoldtexture" }
	},
	resistance: 3.5,
	sounds: {
		"place": "game:block/anvil",
		"walk": "game:walk/stone"
	}
}

Short explanation of each line:

  • code: A unique identifier for your block.
  • creativeinventory: The creative inventory tabs the block should be shown in (currently only 1 tab available)
  • shape: Which model the block should use
  • drawtype: Determines the drawing system, e.g. use 'cube' for normal full cubes or 'json' for custom created shapes.
  • textures: What textures to apply. For simple blocks you can define one single texture for 'all' faces or define one for every facing ('north', 'east', 'west', 'south', 'up', 'down')
  • resistance: How many seconds of real life time it takes to break the block without tools
  • sounds: The sounds to be played when placing/breaking or walking on the block. The prefix game has to be added, since our block has the domain mygoldblock. Otherwise it would try to find those sounds inside our domain.

Now save the file in your workspace inside assets/mygoldblock/blocktypes/ and name it mygoldblock.json.

Naming the Block

To give the block a proper name, we need to create another json file and save it with the following path: assets/mygoldblock/lang/en.json

{
	"block-mygoldblock": "Block of Gold"
}

Testing/ Distribution

The last thing we need to do is to create a zip file of the assets folder inside our workspace. Either you use an external program (such as WinRAR or 7Zip) or you right-click the assets folder and hit Send To -> Compressed (zipped) folder. Eventually you can rename the zip file to MyGoldBlockMod.zip. The zip file can be either used for testing purposes or you can send it to other people so they can use it as well.

Furthermore you need to add a modinfo.json file, check out this tutorial.

To install the mod, navigate to the Vintagestory folder and place it inside the mods folder.

MyGoldBlockMod.zip

2017-01-10 12-33-45.png.

Hint: Use the client command .tfedit if you want to adjust the block position, rotation and scale in Hands, in GUI, when dropped on the ground or in third person mode.

Advanced Properties

Now we do some more advanced stuff with our lovely gold block. We will add random textures, different variants and custom shapes. So let's get started.

Random Textures

So first of all we need some more textures. I have created some variants of the gold block Gold block.png Mygoldtexture1.png Mygoldtexture2.png Mygoldtexture3.png. To keep the name of the textures simple I added a number to each texture name (mygoldtexture.png,mygoldtexture1.png,mygoldtexture2.png,mygoldtexture3.png)

Now we need to add those new textures to the json file.

	textures: {
		all: { 
			base: "block/mygoldtexture",
			alternates: [{base: "block/mygoldtexture1" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture2" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture3" }],
		},
	},

Eventually save it and run Vintagestory again. Now you should see a result like this:

2017-01-10 14-05-03.png

Of course you can add more texture if you would like to.

Variants

Gold is the best, but iron is awesome too ... so what shall we do? Let's add another variant of this block, because we all love iron.

You could duplicate the blocktype file and rename silver to gold in all the places, or you can simply add another variant to the existing blocktype.

Variantgroup: Type

So first of all we need some new textures again: Myirontexture.png Myirontexture1.png Myirontexture2.png Myirontexture3.png

Now we need to change a few things in our json file. We can add all kinds of different groups, but for now we keep it simple. We are adding group called type, with the states gold and iron. You can use any group code you want.

	variantgroups: [
		{ code: "type", states: ["gold", "iron"] }
	],

The next thing we need to do is set textures by type. So we remove our texture property and replace it with a new property texturesbytype, which will allow us to set different textures for each type.


	texturesbytype: {
		"*-gold": {
			all: { 
				base: "block/mygoldtexture",
				alternates: [{base: "block/mygoldtexture1" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture2" }, {base: "block/mygoldtexture3" }],
			},
		},
		"*-iron": {
			all: { 
				base: "block/myirontexture",
				alternates: [{base: "block/myirontexture1" }, {base: "block/myirontexture2" }, {base: "block/myirontexture3" }],
			},
		}
	},

Every group will be added after each other to the blocks code myblockname-mygroup-mysecondgroup. In our example we can save ourselves writing a few extra letters by using the wild card *.

You can also use a more compact definition. Due to way we named our textures we can use the placeholder {type} to determine the texture name, so instead of handling every case individually we can write it like this:

	textures: {
		all: { 
			base: "block/my{type}texture",
			alternates: [{base: "block/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture3" }],
		},
	},

The full blocktype definition could then look like this:

{
	code: "myshinyblock",
	creativeinventory: { "general": ["*"] },
	variantgroups: [
		{ code: "type", states: ["gold", "iron"] }
	],
	blockmaterial: "Stone",
	drawtype: "cube",
	textures: {
		all: { 
			base: "block/my{type}texture",
			alternates: [{base: "block/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture3" }],
		},
	},
	resistance: 3.5,
	sounds: {
		"place": "game:block/anvil",
		"walk": "game:walk/stone"
	}
}

2017-01-10 14-36-58.png

Variantgroup: Condition

Let's at another group to our block, which will determine the condition of this block. There will be two states good and used. We can add this group by adding another property inside variantgroups[].

	variantgroups: [
		{ code: "type", states: ["gold", "iron"] },
		{ code: "condition", states: ["good", "used"]}
	],

To finish implementing this second group we need to take care of every case. We want the good blocks to only use the base texture and the used blocks to also use their random textures:

	texturesbytype: {
		"*-good": {
			all: { 
				base: "block/my{type}texture",
			},
		},
		"*-used": {
			all: { 
				base: "block/my{type}texture",
				alternates: [{base: "block/my{type}texture1" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture2" }, {base: "block/my{type}texture3" }],
			},
		},
	},

The blocks in a good condition or on the left side, while the used ones are on the right:

2017-01-10 15-02-38.png

Custom Shapes

In order to use a custom shape we need to create one first. The engine only supports the model/shape format that's created by the VS Model Creator.

Once you have created your own shape you need to export it as a json file, create a new folder assets/myshinyblock/shapes/block/ and save the file in there. In our example we will use this model Myshinymodel.json and move it to assets/myshinyblock/shapes/block/myshinymodel.json. Now we need to specify the model inside our block type json file.

Therefore we will change the drawtype from cube to json:

	drawtype: "json",

and the shape to myshinymodel

	shape: { base: "block/myshinymodel" },

Although this would be enough theoretically, we also should determine this block as being non-solid, to prevent graphical glitches.

	sidesolid: {
		all: "false"
	},
	sideopaque: {
		all: "false"
	},

So let's run the game. This is how it should look like:

2017-01-12 14-06-27.png

Variants of Custom Shapes

I created another model for the blocks in good condition (myshinymodel1.json), because they should look more awesome, than the ones in used conditions. Therefore we need to copy the json file to assets/myshinyblock/shapes/block/ as well.

In order to specify the shape by type we need to remove the property shape and replace it with shapebytype:

	shapebytype: {
		"*-good": {
			base: "block/myshinymodel1",
		},
		"*-used": {
			base: "block/myshinymodel",
		},
	},

2017-01-12 14-51-45.png

MyShinyBlockMod

There are a lot of more things you can do with the blocktype and model formats. We recommend you to take a look at the Vintage Story block type files to understand how the system is working, in case something was left unexplained. We hope we could introduce you into the basic of adding blocks the game. Advanced Blocks will teach you how to add more functionality to your block.



Vintage Story: Modding
Basics Mod Types | Asset System | Textures | Items | Recipes | Blocks | Model Creator | Release
Advanced Setup(Windows,Linux) | Items | Blocks | Item-Block interractions | Block Behavior | Block Entity | Particles | World Access
Worldgen Terrain | Ores | Trees | Worldgen API
Rendering Shaders and Renderers
Property Overview Item | Block | Block Behaviors